Tag Archives: Extreme Fatigue

Extreme Fatigue

Extreme Fatigue

I have never felt extreme fatigue like I have today.  I woke up sleepy, and spent the entire day feeling like I was about to fall asleep.  This is the strangest feeling I’ve ever experienced.

Taking a walk didn’t help.  In fact, it made me feel more sleepy.  Dinner didn’t help either; it didn’t have an impact either way.

Let’s hope tomorrow I don’t feel like this.

More History

The house on Teal was my parent’s first home.  Prior to buying the house, we lived in rentals.  My little brother never knew what it was like living in a rented house.  In a few cases, they were houses with tenants upstairs and downstairs.

Trouble on Teal

I’ve mentioned a couple of times I got in to trouble when we lived on Teal.  There was the flooding of the farmer’s fields.  Setting the shed on fire (even though that happened near Grandma’s house, it was during the time period we lived on Teal.)

While they were building the homes nearby, I decided to play Superman and dive through the insulation.  I didn’t know how stupid that was, but I must have torn out the insulation of at least 5 or 6 framed homes.

Another time I had Karen and Lisa sit in the front scoop of a tractor with a payloader scoop.  Back then, they left the keys in these things.  I managed to get them off the ground.  I was probably 5 or 6.

I’d also wire up “electric” fences and connect the wires to the fuse box and then throw the switch.  Sparks were all I got.

The Tree House

I found some boys playing in the barley field the last summer we lived in Pocatello.  They were building a treehouse and invited me to join them.  It was at the far end of the field near the Yellowstone Highway.  (Later, that would have been the entrance to a K-Mart parking lot.)

They were a few years older, but I learned how to get a 4×8 sheet of plywood  25 feet off the ground and secured as a floor in a tree house.  It was awesome.  To this day, I can’t believe we pulled it off.  We were 3 stories off the ground and looking across the highway into the 3rd story windows of the Naval Weapons Plant.

They also taught me how to drive a nail without bending it.  It took a lot of practice, but they were patient with me… as long as I brought them lots of nails… which I would scrounge (actually steal come to think of it) from the local housing construction.

The Big Move

When Mom and Dad announced we were moving to Moscow, I was quite excited.  To me it meant friends.  I really didn’t have many in Pocatello.  Many of the kids (boys) near us had farm chores and weren’t outside playing.  I fantasized about meeting new friends.

We had visited Moscow once before.  We stayed in a strip motel next to the railroad tracks and the freight trains kept us awake most of the night.  Dad said our new apartment was on the bluff above where the motel used to be.  He said they tore it down that winter and built a Chevrolet dealership there.  Gubb Mix Chevrolet.

Mom and dad were also going to be the apartment managers in this 40-unit, 2 building complex.  To a 10 year old, that sounded pretty cool.  “Apartment Manager”, just had a sound of prestige.

This also meant we were going to live very close to Jeff and John – our cousins from Mom’s sister Shirley.  They lived in Pullman where Uncle Dick was a professor and audiologist.    Jeff was a couple years younger than me, and John was a little younger than Mark.  They would become our best friends during the year we lived in Moscow.